OK Bozeman High School. So you say you have a policy that students are not allowed to discriminate. So, if a group of students are trying to kick a club off campus because of their beliefs- does that make them guilty of discrimination?

If so, then the LGBT activists at Bozeman High School are the ones who are guilty of intolerance and discrimination. Not only are the LGBT activists guilty of intolerance and discrimination, so are the school administrators.

NBC Montana had a recent report about the Fellowship of Christian Athletes club at the Bozeman High School. LGBT activists are attacking the club and the FCA students because of their Christian beliefs, even though school officials have confirmed that the FCA students have done nothing discriminatory. As NBC Montana reports:

The school district found the local club did not have any instances of discrimination against LGBTQ students, but it did see a problem with the umbrella organization's published Statement of Faith.

The school district gave the Bozeman High FCA two options -- disassociate from the national organization, change their name and follow the school district's policy on inclusion or remain with the Fellowship of Christian Athletes but no longer be recognized as a school club.

The story is now gaining national attention, as organizations like The Christian Post, CBN News, and others are covering the controversy. Matthew Monforton also penned an op-ed with the headline "Big-city bigotry arrives at Bozeman High School."

If the school doesn't change it's anti-Christian discrimination policy, the FCA in Montana says they are ready to stand up for their 1st Amendment rights, and that the Alliance Defending Freedom is on standby to assist.

He told The Christian Post Tuesday that the Bozeman FCA students are not caving under the pressure put on them by the school district and feel the district’s ultimatum is a violation of their First Amendment rights.

“The kids have done research and found some stuff from the National Board of Education talking about students' First Amendment rights,” Veroulis said. “They are going in to discuss with the principal how they feel their First Amendment rights are being violated by this ultimatum.”