Today, Montana Governor Greg Gianforte announced Montana will receive an emergency disaster declaration from President Joe Biden. Initially, the Montana Department of Transportation estimated damage around $29 Million.

Federal aid accompanying the declaration will supplement local and state resources being used due to the damage of the flooding.

With the damage to local infrastructure at Yellowstone National Park, more than $200 Million annually from tourism alone is at stake for Park County, and $68 Million annually for Carbon County.

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“Over the last several days, flooding has destroyed homes, washed away roads and bridges, left Montanans without power and water services, and threatened Montanans' livelihoods,” Gov. Gianforte said. “Securing this major disaster declaration will further help our communities respond to the severe flooding, recover, and rebuild. The state will continue bringing its resources to bear to support communities impacted by flooding.”

Gov. Gianforte continued, “On behalf of all Montanans, I thank both the president for his swift approval of our request and Senator Daines, Senator Tester, and Congressman Rosendale for their work to move our request forward with the president as well as for their unified support of our efforts.”

 

Wednesday, Governor Gianforte announced Montana had submitted a request to President Joe Biden for an expedited presidential major disaster declaration.

Tuesday Governor Gianforte had declared the statewide disaster due to flooding, after verbally authorizing the declaration Monday.

LOOK: Historic 2022 Flooding in Southern Montana Not Soon to Be Forgotten

Widespread flooding wiped out roads, bridges, buildings, and powerlines throughout riverside communities from Yellowstone National Park and Paradise Valley to Red Lodge. The Yellowstone River winding through Billings crested Tuesday, June 14, 2022. At 11:30 a.m. the National Weather Service in Billings reported the river rose above flood stage and was forecasted to hit 14.7 feet, nearly hitting the 15-foot record set in 1997.